Fire, Fire, Fire, Fire: The Fyre Festival as a Warning in the New Age of Investing, Part 1

By: Esmat Hanano, 2019 IAC Spring Intern

In 1974, the Ohio Players released the album Fire, featuring a number of hits including the titular track. As the Ohio Players sing “Fire, Fire, Fire, Fire,” you can almost imagine them trying to warn someone of danger. Fortunately, the song is focused on the band’s love interest rather than any impending inferno. But, the song could have proven useful as a warning to some unlucky investors in 2017. The Fyre Festival, a now infamous and failed music festival, tempted these investors with promises of vast riches and an unforgettable experience. Instead of the experience of a lifetime, investors were treated to an unmitigated disaster that led to numerous lawsuits against the companies involved in planning the festival, and the imprisonment of the mastermind behind the ill-fated festival.

Recently, the Festival’s spiral into chaos was chronicled in two documentaries by Netflix and Hulu. The documentaries provide an interesting look into the organizations behind the Festival and the tactics that were used. The renewed attention on the Fyre Festival, and the chaos it spawned, provides an opportunity to discuss a number of pitfalls that await investors in the rapidly-changing investing landscape of the twenty-first century. This series will focus on the background of the Festival, the tactics employed by Billy McFarland and the organizers of the Fyre Festival, and the lessons that retail investors can learn from the Festival. Additionally, this series will situate the Fyre Festival in relation to other scandals, such as Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme and the controversy surrounding Theranos. As we move through each of these topics, retail investors can begin to understand how to be aware of “too good to be true offers” and what questions they should ask themselves in the age of the social-media influencer turned investment-promoter.