Interns Engage in Investor Education

presentersOn Tuesday April 29, 2014, Investor Advocacy Clinic student interns Scott Evans, Benjamin Stubbs and Patricia Uceda presented “Guidance for your Investment Journey” to a group of Georgia State University College of Law students.

Stubbs began by discussing the need to create a plan and start to save now. He asked the audience to identify their long term goals, which included paying off student loans, retiring and saving for a house.

studentsEvans then discussed the professionals who can help investors meet their goals. He outlined the different services such professionals can provide and showed the audience how to do research on them by using FINRA’s BrokerCheck tool. Participants also learned how to decode different certifications and learn what they mean by using FINRA’s Professional Designations Database.

Uceda provided an overview of the products investors might consider to reach their goals. After analyzing whether the participants were at risk of fraud, the interns showed them how to be prepared to respond to fraudsters’ tactics and hang up on fraud.

If you or your organization are interested in a custom-tailored investor education presentation, please contact the clinic at (404) 413-9270.

GSU Law Students: Be an Informed Investor. Attend the Investor Advocacy Clinic’s Educational Presentation Tomorrow.

LAW_IACApril is financial literacy month, and the Investor Advocacy Clinic’s student interns are making sure that potential investors have the information they need to make wise financial decisions.

On Tuesday, April 29, student interns Scott Evans, Benjamin Stubbs and Patricia Uceda will present “Guidance for Your Investment Journey” at the Georgia State University College of Law to current law students in Room 330 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.  This presentation will help new investors learn how to protect themselves from becoming victims to investment fraud and make wise decisions as they save for their future.

Friday’s Fraud – Affinity Fraud: Scammers in Sheep’s Clothing

By Benjamin Stubbs, Spring 2014 Student Intern

sheepWe’ve all heard the story about the wolf who dressed as a sheep to get an easy meal from an unwary lamb. Unfortunately some disreputable brokers, and people acting like brokers, have used this strategy to steal money from unsuspecting investors. This type of scheme is known as affinity fraud.

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Clinic Students to Present Investor Education During Financial Literacy Month

April is financial literacy month, and the Investor Advocacy Clinic’s student interns are making sure that potential investors have the information they need to make wise financial decisions.

On Tuesday, April 22, interns Thomas Abrahamson, Timothy Guilmette and Nataliya Nemtseva will meet with cadets in Georgia State University’s ROTC.  Their presentation, “Take Charge of Your Financial Future,” will discuss financial readiness, budgeting, saving and planning for the future and is tailored for members of the military.

On Wednesday, April 23, graduate research assistant Dylan Donley and fall 2013 student intern D. Russell Stroud will present “There’s no Such Thing as a Free Lunch: Getting to Know the Red Flags of Fraud and Common Scams Against Seniors” to a group of law students studying elder law.  This presentation will educate future lawyers interested in working with seniors, providing them with information and tools to protect seniors from scams.

On Tuesday, April 29, student interns Scott Evans, Benjamin Stubbs and Patricia Uceda will present “Guidance for Your Investment Journey” at the Georgia State University College of Law to current law students in Room 330 at noon.  This presentation will help new investors learn how to protect themselves from becoming victims to investment fraud and make wise decisions as they save for their future.

Each of these presentations is made possible by a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation.

Interested in an investor education presentation for your organization?  Call us at (404) 413.9270 and we would be happy to discuss how the clinic can create a presentation tailored to your audience.

Friday’s Fraud – Ponzi Schemes: Don’t Believe the Unbelievable

By Benjamin Stubbs, Spring 2014 Student Intern

chasingThis week’s tip: be more like Alice than the Queen. In Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking Glass, when the Queen asked Alice to consider that the Queen was over a hundred years old, Alice tells the Queen that there was no use trying to consider that because “one can’t believe impossible things.” The Queen responded that she had “sometimes … believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

Coming in third on NASAA’s list of most common investment frauds of 2013 are high-yield investments and Ponzi schemes, which are often used to defraud investors because they are chasing high returns and are tricked by promises of “unbelievably high rates of returns.” The simplest way to avoid such scams: don’t believe unbelievable things, no matter how much money someone promises you.

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Friday’s Fraud – Real Estate Investment Schemes: Watch Out for Traps

By Benjamin Stubbs, Spring 2014 Student Intern

trapFor some time it was thought that real estate was a near foolproof investment and that if you owned land you should never sell it. This notion was badly shaken when the real estate bubble burst in 2008. Not only are investments in real estate recognized as risky, but in the words of NASAA, real estate investments “are popular with con artists” as well.

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Friday’s Fraud – Private Offerings: Investing, Fraud and the Value of Referees

By Benjamin Stubbs, Spring 2014 Student Intern

refMany of us learned in elementary school how important referees can be.  When close plays and mistakes happens, without a referee, no one has the final word and it’s difficult to correct mistakes and prevent cheating.  Though referees may be annoying and even enraging at times, it is important to have someone watching what happens to make sure rules are followed and games are played fairly. Continue reading